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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner found in the catalog.

Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner

Joseph Capizzi

Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner

by Joseph Capizzi

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Published by Oregon State University, Extension Service in Corvallis .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth -- Control.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPrepared by Joseph Capizzi.
    SeriesFS / Oregon State University. Extension Service -- 214., Fact sheet (Oregon State University. Extension Service) -- 214.
    ContributionsOregon State University. Extension Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18203552M

    For control of Douglas Fir Tussock Moths: In landscape plantings, pyrethroids such as permethrin (Astro), cyfluthrin (Tempo), bifenthrin (Talstar, Onyx) and lambda-cyhalothrin (Scimitar) are effective against Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars. Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars are quite hairy with distinct tufts of hairs on their back. Needle loss is often concentrated at the top of the tree; insect evidence can be detected year round (eggs in winter, caterpillars in spring, adults flying in late summer).

    Black-tusked tussock moth caterpillars are munching fir trees along Colorado’s Front Range, spreading acr acres in one year and forcing . TM Biocontrol-1 is a viral biopesticide produced by the U.S. Forest Service that is used, along with various commercial Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) products, for the control of the Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM), Orgyia pseudotsugata, in the Pacific Northwest. Improving the efficacy of these products involves bioassay in a standard (Goose Lake.

    The Douglas-fir tussock moth is one of the most destructive forest defoliators in western North America. Densities of most tussock-moth populations fluctuate over time with considerable regularity. Fluctuations in density on warm, dry sites where populations have a high intrinsic rate of increase are more likely to periodically reach outbreak Cited by: 5. The caterpillars of the Douglas-fir Tussock moth chew on the needles of spruces, douglas fir, and true firs. The young caterpillars have long black/grey hair turning brightly colored as they mature. A mature larva is inches long with a grayish brown body and a black head. The moth spends the winter as an egg within an egg mass.


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Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner by Joseph Capizzi Download PDF EPUB FB2

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Control by the Homeowner The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseuclot-sugata, is one of the most injurious insect pests of Douglas-fir and true firs found in the West.

Out-breaks may develop explosively and when they do, the caterpillars will attack less preferred species such as pine, larch, spruce, and other species. Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner (Oregon State University. Extension Service.

FS) [Joseph Capizzi] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Joseph Capizzi. Orgyia pseudotsugata (Douglas-fir tussock moth) is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae found in western North America. Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to : Erebidae.

Tussock Moth Control Tussock moth control is an important component of any property owner in urban Colorado. The Douglas Fir tussock moth is a common pest in Colorado. The Tussock moth caterpillar (Orgyia psuedotsugata) eat the needles of spruce, Douglas fir, and true fir trees. These caterpillars cause defoliation, which occurs rapidly from.

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

The Lymantriinae (formerly called the Lymantriidae) are a subfamily of moths of the family Erebidae. Many of its component species are referred to as "tussock moths" of one sort or another.

The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired : Insecta. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region.

Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. Damage usually appears first in the tops of trees and progresses downward, sometimes over several years. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator.

Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior. Severe defoliation by the tussock moth may result in tree mortality, top-kill or weakened trees, making. Successful management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth depends on carefully monitoring populations within high-hazard stands during the non-outbreak and building phases.

Once an outbreak begins, viable treatment options decrease significantly. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, O. pseudotsugata, feeds primarily on Douglas-fir and true firs. Lighter-colored tufts of hair along the back, red spots on top, and an orange stripe along each side distinguish its mature larvae from those of the rusty tussock moth.

Life cycle. Tussock moths overwinter as eggs. Hosts: Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce Figure 8. Adult male (left) and femail (right) Douglas-fir moth.

Symptoms/Signs: The caterpillar of the Douglas-fir tussock moth is grayish with brightly colored tufts of hair and a shiny black are also two long horns of black hairs behind the head and another at the rear of the body.

How Does the Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Kill Trees. Douglas-fir tussock moths are defoliators—they eat the leaves off of plants. More precisely, immature caterpillars climb to the top of the tree or building where they hatched, spin a silk web to sail on, float on the wind until they land, and eat any leaves they can find.

Treatment Options for Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth About Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a defoliator of Douglas-fir, true fir (Abies spp.) and spruce (Engelmann and Colorado blue) trees. Native to Colorado’s forests, the insect also may impact Colorado blue spruce in urban settings.

Douglas-Fir tussock moth has been most prevalent in our landscape trees but is also in forested areas on Cheyenne Mountain and on Rampart Range Road. Spruce budworm has surged in forested areas such as Cheyenne Cañon, Cheyenne Mountain and along Rampart Range Road.

It can also move into our landscape Spruce and Fir trees. Douglas-Fir Tussock Moths Author: W. Cranshaw, I. Aguayo, and D.A. Leatherman Subject: Douglas-fir tussock moths are important defoliators of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region.

The insects cause serious aesthetic damage to Colorado blue spruce in urban landscapes. Orgyia pseudotsugata. Pest description and damage The adult male is brown to gray and about 1 inch across and flies during the day in search of the wingless female moth.

The larvae feed on pine needles and the mature larvae are about an inch long, hairy, gray or. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Biology and Life Cycle (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth and Tussockosis (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Treatment and Control In My Backyard (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth NPV Virus Information Sheet (PDF) History of Douglas-fir Tussock Moth in South-East BC (PDF) DFTM Treatment Maps; Back to Douglas-fir Tussock Moth.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a destructive native defoliator of Douglas-fir. Outbreaks of tussock moth occur every ten to twelve years causing significant damage and mortality to Douglas-fir stands in the interior of the province. These outbreaks tend to last up to four years before natural controls such as predators, parasites, pathogens.

Tussock moths in the genus Orgyia are small moths that are best-known because of their attractive larvae. Figure 1. Fir tussock moth (Orgyia detrita) caterpillar (dorsal view). Photograph by Donald W. Hall, University of Florida. th0 Douglas fir tussock moth in the Pacific fior4hwe/t A SEMINAR SEMINAR CHAIRMAN Henry J.

Korp Deputy Assistant Administrator for Pesticide Programs U.S. Environmental Protection Agency PROGRAM COMMITTEE Roger Pierpont, Entomologist Ecological Effects Branch, Criteria and Evaluation Division Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S.

Environmental. deals in some way with either the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), or a related species. Specifically, publications and 82 unpublished documents make some reference, at least, to the Douglas-fir tussock moth; 55 are concerned with other species in the same genus.Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are all equally acceptable.

In the south (California, Nevada, Arizona, and Figure 1. -- Distrubution of host type where Douglas-fir tussock moth may be found and location of outbreaks. trees, brush, and buildings, but once an outbreak subsides, finding caterpil-lars is difficult.

Defoliation by the tussock moth.Douglas-fir is the preferred host, but pine, arborvitae, spruce, and true firs also are attacked. Biology and life history Larvae hibernate in dense clusters on .